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Dutch

Double Gourd Vase

Blue and white vase created early 18th century, polychrome enamels added mid-18th century

Hand-painted enamels on tin-glazed earthenware (delft)

14 in. H x 7 in. Dm at the widest point (35.5 cm H x 17.8 cm Dm)

$4,000.00

This brightly colored blue and white Dutch delft vase is a testament to the Western appreciation of and quest for Chinese porcelain.⁠ The recipe for porcelain was a mystery in Europe until well into the 18th century. Chinese porcelains held great status as works of art and were exported to the West in huge quantities. At the same time, European factories created their own wares to emulate the Chinese blue and white pieces.⁠ Delft, or tin-glazed earthenware, was the Netherlands’s response to blue and white porcelain.⁠ What is especially interesting about this particular Dutch delft vase, however, is its decoration. The overglaze polychrome enamels reference ⁠”clobbered” china, or blue and white Chinese export porcelains which were later decorated in Europe with overglaze polychrome accents.⁠ While the vase is clearly earthenware, not porcelain, the high status of Chinese wares in that society is obvious in its emulation of style, motifs, and treatment. A faux reign mark completes the allusion to Chinese porcelain.

This brightly colored blue and white Dutch delft vase is a testament to the Western appreciation of and quest for Chinese porcelain.⁠ The recipe for porcelain was a mystery in Europe until well into the 18th century. Chinese porcelains held great status as works of art and were exported to the West in huge quantities. At the same time, European factories created their own wares to emulate the Chinese blue and white pieces.⁠ Delft, or tin-glazed earthenware, was the Netherlands’s response to blue and white porcelain.⁠ What is especially interesting about this particular Dutch delft vase, however, is its decoration. The overglaze polychrome enamels reference ⁠”clobbered” china, or blue and white Chinese export porcelains which were later decorated in Europe with overglaze polychrome accents.⁠ While the vase is clearly earthenware, not porcelain, the high status of Chinese wares in that society is obvious in its emulation of style, motifs, and treatment. A faux reign mark completes the allusion to Chinese porcelain.

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Condition

Very good. Attractive craquelure all over. An area of scuffing originally made after glazing, measuring 5/8 in. x 3/8 in. Some wear to black around top and bottom rims.

For a detailed condition report, please contact us.

Provenance

J. Zeberg, Antwerp

Very good. Attractive craquelure all over. An area of scuffing originally made after glazing, measuring 5/8 in. x 3/8 in. Some wear to black around top and bottom rims.

For a detailed condition report, please contact us.

J. Zeberg, Antwerp

This item ships free to the continental US, and globally for a flat-rate fee of $150.

All objects are packed with utmost care by our team of expert fine art shippers. All items are shipped with parcel insurance.

For more information on our shipping policies, please visit our FAQ Page.

All of our objects look even more stunning in person!

However, in case you are not satisfied with your purchase, we are willing to accept returns.

For more information on our return policies, please visit our FAQ page.

An essay for this object is forthcoming. Sign up for our email list to be the first to know when this essay is published!

This item ships free to the continental US, and globally for a flat-rate fee of $150.

All objects are packed with utmost care by our team of expert fine art shippers. All items are shipped with parcel insurance.

For more information on our shipping policies, please visit our FAQ Page.

All of our objects look even more stunning in person!

However, in case you are not satisfied with your purchase, we are willing to accept returns.

For more information on our return policies, please visit our FAQ page.

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